Can You Keep Your Home after a Short Sale?

By Andrew J Thompson

One of the requirements for any short sale is that the property must be owner occupied.   Obviously, this is a requirement imposed upon the seller.  Another requirement is that the buyer must not be a “related party”.  This means a spouse, ex-spouse, parent, child, sibling, or possibly a partner, employer, landlord, or even a friend. The lender has great latitude in determining who fits the definition of a related party.

OK, so let’s say you’re living in a home you bought for $250,000 several years ago.  The market has reduced the value of the home to around $175,000 today, you’ve fallen behind on your mortgage, and the bank says you now owe them around $325,000.  Regardless of income, a loan modification probably doesn’t make sense at this point.

But you could reasonably make payments on what the house is worth today, and have faithfully tried to work with the bank ever since you fell behind.   The house is very attractive at the price to a third party buyer-investor.  You don’t know who this is, but chances are good your realtor will know what the buyer is looking as much as he/she knows your situation, and they may well be looking for a good renter – and the best renter might just happen to be you.

Is this plausible?  Basically it depends on the underwriting requirements of the lender.  If they will allow it, or have no means of prohibiting it, then yes, it could be plausible.  The problem is they have to approve the short sale, and if they feel like they will get a little less than they could through another form of sale, they are not likely to approve it – or it could take a very long time to get approval.

But if it takes a long time – so what?  What do you lose when this happens?  Probably not very much, if anything.  It just means additional months you are living in your own home and that you cannot make payments while you do.

The scenario is definitely one worth exploring if your hope for a loan modification is minimal, and if it seems your potential for recourse against the lender – as in most cases – is minimal.

Our firm has helped dozens of homeowners in foreclosure situations figure out ways to save heir homes.  If you think there may be a way we can help you, please call us at (317) 564-4976 for a free consultation.